Archive for postpartum

Doula Life: 3 postpartum foods for healing and lactation

The sole baby girl I was expecting this spring/summer birth season was born early this morning! I still can’t get over how perfect little Beatrice is and how strong her Mama was throughout.

A Galactagogue (great word!!!) is a food, herb, or supplement that aids breast milk supply. Prior to leaving for the hospital, I had prepared the following foods for my client to promote healing for her and baby, to promote lactation, and to intensify her nutrient stores. These could be some great meals for new moms out there, doulas, or just shiny, healthy people looking for whole food, nutrient dense recipes!

Slow baked salmon, kale and quinoa with lemon, fennel, and dill seasoning

In a sheet pan, I slow roasted (275 F) 2 large salmon planks on a bed of spinach, kale and pre-cooked quinoa, covered in lemon and fennel slices, seasoned with salt, pepper, olive oil and fresh dill.

Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are filled with vitamin A, vitamin C, iron, and are non-dairy sources of calcium.
Salmon is full of a special kind of fat called DHA that promotes brain growth in infants (and is found in breast milk and formula). The more DHA you eat, the more you will have in your breast milk, and it is also thought to reduce stress and postpartum depression. Quinoa and whole grains provide folic acid important in breastfeeding as well.

Chickpea and Spinach Soup (If on AIP , replace chickpeas with cauliflower)

In a blender or food processor I combine 2 cups of cooked chickpeas, 1 bag of cooked spinach, 1 pan roasted yellow onion and 3 cloves of garlic, and 4 cups of bone broth (chicken stock). I intensify the healing power of my broth my adding a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar to draw out the marrow goodness, and I season it with salt, pepper, and fresh herbs. After that is blended well to smooth, I stir in 1 can of coconut milk.

Soup in general helps to increase milk production as it heals. Warm foods also enliven your Qi (or life force), according to Eastern tradition, and thus promote lactation and healing. Bone broth is always good for everyone after surgeries, and I love bringing it as a “get well” gift, so it is even more relevant if you have had a C-section or episiotomy.

Blueberry Oat Muffins

This recipe is coming in my next blog post! Oats, though, provide a new Mom the necessary folic acid and iron (if the tummy can take them) and blueberries are well known antioxidants and provide an energy boost when needed!

Now I’m off to get some sleep!


To Doula or not to Doula

When I tell people that I’m becoming a Doula, the most common response is “what do they do?” and “why do people want one?”Well my friends…I have a pretty compelling list of reasons for that I came up with last night. I know that I won’t go through my future pregnancies without a Doula, and I hope you consider all the richness that this service can add to your childbearing journey!

1. One of the most obvious reasons that I’ve come across is that asking a father or other family member to provide primary support is an extremely difficult expectation put in place by modern society. A Doula enables a father or other family member to present at their comfort level; run the gamut of feelings and fears, and still be able to remain present spiritually for the mother and child in labor.

2. Doulas are trained in massage and relaxation techniques and use bonus natural medicines like essential oils, herbal tinctures, and hypnosis pain control. You are 100% guaranteed to be more comfortable and experience less pain through these techniques. If you also choose to use a breathing technique from another class, Doulas are trained to support you in that as well. It’s like a relaxation and pain control UPGRADE.

3. The largest study to date of Doula-assisted medical births shows a major reduction in length of labor, and a 50% reduction in unnecessary C-Sections. Doulas help to moderate procedures that may not be in your birth plan if they are avoidable, such as pitocin augmentation, membrane rupture, epidural, episiotomy, or any other preference for the expecting mother.

4. A dual certified birth/ postpartum Doula is typically with you from 3 months before delivery to 3 months after. Studies show that this constant companionship and support can have a truly positive effect on a mother’s long term view of herself and her relationship with her child. This is the best part to me! What more do you need to know?

5. If you are planing your birth at a Birth Center, then you may have an individual midwife who is trained in Doula techniques and Nursing, and committed to you through your pregnancy- woohoo! If you are birthing in a hospital, then you should contact me or check out your local DONA listings for options in pregnancy, birth, and postpartum companionship!