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Archive for holistic medicine

Essential Oil Highlight- Thieves Oil

A rendering of the black death (1347-1351) by an unknown artist

A rendering of the black death (1347-1351) by an unknown artist

Thieves Oil is so named because because of Medieval Spice Traders. As we know, the precious spices and plants of the middle east and far east came to Europe hundreds, even thousands of years ago (as archaeology demonstrates). Explorers popularized the fragrances and tastes of these exotic essences when trade became more world-wide in the 14th century — can you imagine life without the smell of clove at Christmas? Or jasmine and vanilla on your skin? Anyway, legend has it that the plague suffered business for merchants so much that they resorted to the unthinkable– grave-robbing! As the dead outnumbered the living at this time in Europe, it had become the most lucrative “trade” there was, thus the merchants became thieves. So at night, the thieves covered themselves with every oil essence they knew to be protective, healing, and immune boosting, so that they could rummage through the graves of the plagued without risking their health or their lives—and it worked!

Thieves Oil is a delicious combination of wild orange peel, cinnamon bark, clove bud, eucalyptus leaf, and Rosemary flower essential oils. It smells like Christmas, and if you rub it on your feet every night, I seriously doubt you will ever get sick (regardless of your night time activities) I use this as my daily hand soap, my non-toxic household cleanser, my natural cold & flu medicine (in a veggie capsule), my toothpaste, and diffuse as a warm scent.

 

getting started with acupuncture

I have found acupuncture to be extremely effective in combating my IBD symptoms lately. While my diet focuses on my gut health, I sought acupuncture as a holistic supplement to diet & exercise this fall after a 3 week battle with vertigo. I cannot praise the practice and specifically Chapel Hill’s acupuncture healing center enough. After 3 visits and 6 weeks, I am feeling more energetic, hopeful, healthful, and focused than I have in a long time.

Acupuncture approaches IBD and autoimmune diseases from a perspective we often forget, reminding us that our organs and organ systems are totally intertwined in symbiosis. Those of us who struggle with gut and digestive health see dramatic ramifications in thyroid and liver function, especially. I know what you’re thinking–Seriously? SO unfair that because you suffer with one ailment you are more prone to others? It’s sadly true though. There’ an equilibrium we have to keep up and when one organ system MAJORLY fails, then the others are put upon. Because of my GI disease, I need liver balance and thyroid balance and because those are out of whack, so are my adrenals. It can get overwhelming!

Enter, Chinese Medicine. acupuncture is a key tenant of traditional Chinese medicine. It is used for balancing the key life imagesforce known as qi (or chi) that is believed to flow through Meridians or pathways in the body. The small needles are inserted along these pathways, stimulating movement or “life force.” It’s beautiful in its simplicity. When you suffer from issues affecting your thyroid, digestion, gut, and immune system you can get so bogged down in the fatigue and lethargy of it all. Acupuncture leaves me feeling lighter and more energetic.

Needlephobic? The needles rarely hurt. The exception for me are times like this morning when my qi grabbed at the needle in my throat as it gained energy and movement through my body. I just look at it as proof that it’s working!