Archive for gut health

Easy Bone Broth Recipe to Make Right Now

Supporting your gut health is INTEGRAL to having energy and vitality. Some of us naturally enjoy a more diverse Microbiome than others, but the truth is that everyone should nourish their gut regularly. Recently, I wrote about the importance of probiotics and digestive enzymes in my own healing experience, but these things become expensive! Bone broth is one of the cheapest and most effective ways to nourish your gut lining and reduce inflammation- so why aren’t you doing it yet?

Do you buy bone in meat? Why not? It’s cheaper and has more flavor.

Do you discard the bones? Why? Would you throw away a multi-vitamin or a cup of superfood like chia seeds?

The marrow inside the bones of animals is dense with nutrients and minerals that we can’t find in any other source. Bone marrow, and thus bone broth, contains collagen, glutamine, glycine and proline, which reduce inflammation of all kinds– not solely gut inflammation. In short, our grandmother’s chicken soup cured our colds with more than just love and savory deliciousness.

If you take small, easy, cheap steps toward good health, then you’ll become addicted to the positive results. Remember, Hippocrates, father of medicine, told us: All disease begins in the gut. 

Easy Bone Broth Recipe

If you start buying (antibiotic-free, organic) bone in meat, then simply gather all your bones into a pot as soon as you are done.

Add filtered water to cover the bones X 2 (twice as much as you need to cover bones)

Add 2 tablespoons of Apple Cider vinegar to draw the marrow out of the bones

Season your broth with salt, pepper, one bay leaf, turmeric, sage, tarragon, or anything you might have in your spice drawer!

If you have carrots and celery, you can add those, but it’s not necessary– this is supposed to be convenient for you!

Bring to a boil and then let simmer for AT LEAST 4 HOURS to draw out nutrients.

what to do with extra bone broth

  • drizzle on dog or cat food for healthier pets
  • use as a base for homemade stews, or sauces– I’m making homemade enchilada sauce with it tonight!
  • freeze in an ice cube tray for later sauces or cups of broth

Pointy end down

Eggs have a natural air sac in their blunt end, where an incubating chick receives its oxygen for survival <3 Eggs are also always laid blunt end down, so that they have the most surface area to land on and cushion themselves. When an egg is stored pointy end up, with the air sac at the bottom, that sac will slowly rise and move towards the yolk, bringing any air and bacteria with it.  That will hasten not only the aging process of the egg, making it less fresh since keeping the yolk completely enclosed within the white protects the yolk from drying out, but also increase the likelihood that salmonella or other bacteria will reach the yolk more quickly and contaminate the egg. There is also a chance the air sac will rupture and contaminate the egg with any bacteria it contains. [fresh eggs daily.com]

Probiotic Tip #1: SCOBY Bryant For the Win!

SCOBY= symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast

A Scoby is used in the brewing of Kombucha Tea. They are surprisingly simple to create in the comfort of your own home, especially this time of year since they thrive in warm, damp, dark settings–Thanks 105 degrees with humidity! My Scoby formed at home in just over a week, and you can make one too by following these steps:

  1. Use a sterile- clean glass jar, such as these from Ikea that I love
  2. To your jar, add a bottle of store bought kombucha (or some tea borrowed from a reliable source)
  3. Brew some simple green (or black) tea and add 1 cup to your kombucha jar
  4. Sprinkle in sugar to speed up fermentation
  5. WAIT for this guy!IMG_0494

After you have your SCOBY and a Gallon Jar, you can make your own home batch of Kombucha and feel the probiotic magic happen in your gut!

Stay Tuned for Probiotic Tips #2 Homemade Yogurt and #3 Homemade Sauerkraut

(Credit to my friend Darren for naming the SCOBY)